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Sweat: the Great Detoxifier?

From eNewsletter 3/13/2019

DID YOU KNOW that many doctors now recommend letting a fever run its course unless it is abnormally high? In a new study from Immunity, scientists explain that fever alters immune cells, like lymphocytes, to make them better able to travel via blood vessels to reach the site of infection. Fever does this by increasing the expression of heat shock, like how a trigger activates propulsion with a spark. Blocking this spark, with aspirin or NSAIDs, inhibits the effectiveness of immune cells during infection, which can cause the infection to linger and travel to other areas of the body.


SWEAT: THE GREAT DETOXIFIER

Bonnie & Steve: Over the last decade, there have been myriad studies lauding the benefits of sauna therapy, although pundits claim that sweat does nothing for detoxification. We've had numerous clients use sauna therapy for treating heavy metal toxicity. It's a pretty simple cause and effect. Get a hair analysis before therapy. Depending upon the severity of toxicity, do 10 to 20 sessions of far infrared sauna therapy. Then, retest with another hair analysis. In most cases, heavy metal levels drop precipitously. Recent research seems to agree.


Researchers assessed the concentration of various toxic elements in three body fluids: blood, urine and sweat and analyzed them for approximately 120 various compounds, including toxic elements. Many toxic elements appeared to be preferentially excreted through sweat, some that were not found in blood. Thus, induced sweating seems an ideal method for eliminating many toxic elements from the human body.


Induced perspiration was useful to facilitate elimination of toxic phthalate compounds. The researchers suggest sweat analysis should be used to establish the existence of phthalate compounds in the human body.


Sweat analysis should also be considered as an additional method for monitoring accumulation of Bisphenol A (BPA) in humans. Induced sweating proved to be a strong therapy for elimination of BPA in a recent study.


Finally, scientists found arsenic skin excretion was severalfold higher than what they found in urine. Cadmium was more concentrated in sweat than in blood plasma. They found mercury levels normalized with repeated sauna therapy. The researchers were convinced sweating deserves consideration for toxic element detoxification.


IMPACT OF FLUORIDE EXCESS

Steve: The argument for or against the effects of increased exposure to fluoride have reached a fever pitch, so much so that the CDC had to get involved...this article is reserved for NCI Well Connect Members. You can get this article by signing up here.


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